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Mike Pence Path to 2024 run

30 March, 2021

The former vice president of United States, Mike Pence is gradually reentering public life as he sets his eyes a run for the White House comes 2024. He’s now joining conservative organizations, writing op-eds, delivering speeches and steadily launching advocacy group that will focus on promoting the his boss, Donald Trump led administration`s accomplishments.

Donald Trump’s earlier this month neglect in mentioning Pence as one of the future leader of the Republican party during a podcast interview indeed signals that former vice president’s, Pence is in for a rare challenge. To many, Pence is viewed with suspicion among many Republicans for observing his constitutional duty in January in facilitating a peaceful transfer of power to the Biden administration.

For Mike to prevail in a Republican presidential primary for 2024, he needs to reinforce his loyalty to Trump while defending his decisions during the final days of the administration when the president cooked up voter fraud conspiracy which contributed to violent riot at the US Capitol.

“Anybody who can pull off an endorsement of Ted Cruz and become Donald Trump’s vice presidential nominee should not be counted out,” said Republican strategist Alice Stewart, who worked for Cruz’s 2016 presidential campaign when Pence endorsed him. “He has a way of splitting hairs and threading the needle that has paid off in the past.”

Thou Mike Pence aides generally debunked talk of the next presidential election. They claimed he is more focused on his family and next year’s midterm elections, when Republicans are well positioned to regain at least one chamber of Congress.

“I think 2024’s a long time away and if Mike Pence runs for president he will appeal to the Republican base in a way that will make him a strong contender,” said Republican Rep. Jim Banks of Indiana, who chairs the conservative Republican Study Committee and has already endorsed a Pence 2024 run. “If and when Mike Pence steps back up to the plate, I think he will have strong appeal among Republicans nationwide.”

As Pence declined to comment on this story, Trump aides warned against reading unwarranted meaning into the omission during the podcast interview.

“That was not an exclusive list,” said Trump adviser Jason Miller. Still, Trump continued to deride Pence in the interview, falsely claiming Pence had the authority to unilaterally overturn the results of the election, even though he did not.

Trump has not said whether he will seek the White House again in 2024. If he doesn’t, other Republicans are making clear they won’t cede the race to Pence. Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, for instance, is already visiting the critical primary states of Iowa and New Hampshire.

According to Pence`s aides, he has been in continued conversation with his evangelical allies, and plans to spend much of the next two years helping Republican candidates as they trying to get set to reclaiming the House and Senate majorities in 2022. In addition, he’s planning to launch an advocacy organization that aides and allies say will give him a platform to defend the Trump administration’s record and push back on the current president’s policies as he tries to merge the traditional conservative movement with Trumpism.

“Obviously Mike Pence has a very different persona, a very different tone. That probably is an understatement,” said former Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, a longtime friend who now leads the Young America’s Foundation. “As long as he can still talk about the things that Trump voters care about, but do so in a way that’s more reflective of kind of a Midwesterner, that I think … would be attractive to those voters.”

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