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US sailors tested Covid-19 positive AGAIN after returning to the coronavirus-hit aircraft carrier

The Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Barry (DDG 52) conducting underway operations on April 28, 2020 in the South China Sea © AFP / Samuel HARDGROVE / US NAVY

15 May, 2020

Five American sailors have tested positive for Covid-19 for a second time after resuming duty on board an aircraft carrier that saw a major outbreak in March.

The US Navy imposed strict screenings before allowing sailors to re-board the ill-fated USS ‘Theodore Roosevelt’ – where more than 1,000 personnel contracted the virus in March – however, five sailors nonetheless tested positive again after returning to the ship as confirmed by the military.

“Five [‘Theodore Roosevelt’] sailors who previously tested Covid positive and met rigorous recovery criteria have retested positive,” Navy spokesperson Commander Myers Vasquez said in a statement, adding that the sailors were “immediately removed from the ship and placed back in isolation.”

The five sailors developed influenza-like illness symptoms and executed their personal responsibility by reporting to medical for evaluation.

Others who came in close contact with the infected sailors have also been taken off the ship and placed into quarantine “out of an abundance of caution,” a US official told CNN.

At least 26 US warships in total have detected the virus among their crews, according to the Navy, the latest being the USS ‘Kidd,’ a guided missile destroyer with nearly 100 infected sailors. Much like the ‘Roosevelt’ – which had to abandon its mission in the South China Sea – the ‘Kidd’was stricken while patrolling the Eastern Pacific on a ‘war on drugs’ mission targeting Venezuela, and was forced to return to port in San Diego.

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